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March 09, 2019

Negotiating Tip 94: Attending To The Details

Ignore the details,  pay the price!

The difference between success and failure in negotiating is that the winners seem to know the rules of the negotiating game and attend to the details.  Those details often come to us in an unrelated and disjointed manner.  But they still rule the day.  Here are a few for your consideration and implementation. 
 

  • Never be the party that suggests, "Let's split the difference."  Instead insist that you get a specific proposal from your opponent, even if that proposal is splitting the difference.  Our strategy stems from the fact that it's tough to counter a "split the difference" proposal but easy to counter a specific one.
 
  • Remember that 80% of the concessions and movement seems to come in the last 20% of the time.  Knowing that, don't leave crucial issues to the very end.  Get them on the bargaining agenda early. 
 
  • Consider including a "throw away" issue to the items being negotiated.  A "throw away" is an issue that sounds important but is of little concern or value to you.  That issue can be conceded during that last 20% of the time (near the end of the negotiations) and prompt your opponent to accept a deal which is advantageous to you.  Think ahead of time, "What could I reasonably ask for that sounds crucial but isn't a big deal to me?"  That's your throw away. 
 
  • The person under the greatest time pressure generally loses in a negotiation.  Knowing that, we should seek to learn the time pressures of our opponent and keep our time options secret and flexible.

Good negotiators stand out because they attend to the details as they KEEP Negotiating.

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